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 BulliBill's 1959 Double-Cab restoration... 
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Post Re: BulliBill's 1959 Double-Cab restoration...
Okay, with the frame padded and mounted in the jaw of my bench vice, the frame assembly stands upright on it's own and both my hands are free to work on inserting the rubber seal.

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I thought I'd need to use the slippery goo to assist the thick rubber into the metals tracks, but in this case I personally found it too slippery. So I ended up pressing this seal in dry, and overall it went better than I thought. But first I got my yellow HF plastic pry bars handy. No use of any metal tools next to that pretty Dove Blue paint. And needless to say, but you slow down in this step and take your time pushing and prying rubber against paint. You don't want any "OH SHIT!" moments doing this.

I laid the seal loosely in place and located exactly where the flat chrome vent latch "plate" needed to come through the rubber seal, and where the painted upper pivot for the vent frame passed through...
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...and then I used a combination of new sharp razor blades and an #11 Exacto knife with a fresh, sharp #11 blade to cut slots through the rubber seal. Measure at least twice, cut a little, test fit, cut a little more if needed.

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Once your slots are cut, I found it easiest to start at the bottom of the seal, and I put the end of the seal up against the metal pillar that the scrapper seal will go on later. Slide the rubber over the flat chrome latch plate. I found it easiest to tilt the seal into one side of those metal tracks and then with fingers and occasionally a plastic scrapper work the other side of the rubber down and into the other track. If it seems that the rubber is down and in between the metal tracks, I use the wide flat edge of the yellow plastic pry at a slight angle to give it one more settling push into those unseen tracks.

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After that, and only then do I attempt to move the outer rubber flaps that you'll always see back over the painted metal and into final position. Lots of rubber massaging goes on during all of this! Keep moving a few inches at a time around the bottom curve, up the forward post towards the upper curve. Stop around here to slip the painted upper pivot metal through your cut slit for it, and then continue massaging that rubber into the hidden track until you finish against the scrapper metal post. Wooo Hooo! Great feeling to have one done, until you realize you have one more to do!

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Then I inserted the smaller straight "scrapper" (for the rearward edge of the vent glass). I trimmed the lower end of the rubber to meet the previously installed intricate seal and then easily inserted this scrapper using the yellow plastic pry bar. As I approached the top, I trimmed the scrapper rubber to meet and seal against the upper intricate rubber vent seal.

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Bill


Thu Jul 09, 2015 7:49 am
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Post Re: BulliBill's 1959 Double-Cab restoration...
With both vent window rubber seal sets installed in place, we're ready to install the already assembled vent window assemblies. This part is relatively simple and I didn't even take many photos, but you'll figure it out easily enough. Slow down, take a swig, and slowly take your left or right side vent window assembly in hand, smear a little coating of that wonderful slippery goo on the smooth shaft of the vent frame and insert the threaded end slowly into the hole in the rubber seal and carefully wiggle the vent window frame downward.

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Be careful not to bang your painted vent frame into the door window frame paint! The slippery goo will help here. Before you push too far, stop to put the metal fixing washer and the phenolic fiber washer on before you pass the shaft thru that angled bracket inside the door, then push it all the way down, add the other washers, tension spring, loch washer and nut. Do not tighten it yet. See my sketch for the proper order of placement...

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In the photo, you'll install the hardware in order, left to right, with the first two put on the shaft before it passes through the metal frame bracket, then the rest as seen in my crude sketch. You should have seven pieces of mounting hardware.

Okay, now it's time to attach the top mount of the vent window assembly to the top mount on the frame. I chose to use the rivet and fiber washer kit provided by the great folks at Wolfsburg West. You'll need two small rivets and two small fiber washers. I went to my local hardware store and bought a variety of three ball bearings seen below.

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I lined up the top pivot holes, dropped the rivet (head upward) into the pivot mount welded to the main frame, slid the tiny fiber washer in and got the rivet through it, then pushed the rivet down through the pivot mount attached to the vent window assembly. Now it's time to crush the rivet. In the end, I think I only used the larger two of the three ball bearings that I bought for "mushrooming" those hollow rivets into place. Great care is needed here around your paint. I got my Vise Grip pliers and adjusted the opening so that I could crush the ball bearing into the hollow rivet. Since the plier jaws are "toothy" for grip, I didn't want to scratch the head of the rivet up, so I wadded up a few layers of blue paper shop towel and as you can see in the photo below I padded the top of the rivet.

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Of the two ball bearings that I did use, I think I started with the 3/16" one. I carefully applied more and more pressure on the Vice Grips and watched the rivet start to mushroom and tighten. Then I removed the pliers and checked the progress. Looking good so far, I have a bit more mushrooming to go, although I can see I have a tiny spot to touch up with paint.

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Then I switched to the larger 1/4" one to finish the job up. Still need to go a little tighter below...

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Now is the time to adjust the tension on the lower vent window shaft so that when you open them out on the highway, they will stay open, but still allow you to easily close them. Just snug up the lower nut, try out the vent window for tension, tighten a little more, etc. Once you're happy, bent the lock washer tabs down to hold that nut and tension in place.

Now do the other side too!

Yay! Vent windows are now behind me!

Bill Bowman


Mon Jul 13, 2015 11:06 pm
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Post Re: BulliBill's 1959 Double-Cab restoration...
For me, the vent window was the tougher part of the assembly of the cab window assemblies. The installation of the felt tracks, divider bar, glass, etc. is relatively easy and doesn't need too much explanation. I took just a few shots of the completion of these windows.

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Here you see me trial fitting all of the felt channels. Once I was happy with their fit, then I ran a bead of black 3M Super Adhesive on the backside of each strip and pushed them into final position. I then installed both the stationary and sliding cab window glass into the frame, installed the painted divider bar with it's upper barbed fixing clip, and then installed the felt into the bottom painted frame piece. Then I screwed it into place in the main frame and then slipped the painted strip with the notches into place and screwed it down.

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Here I trial fit the lower painted bar with the felt glued in before removing it again to mount the glass and divider bar.

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I completed the driver frame first and then completed the passenger side assembly. I ran a tap or die through any threaded hole or stud to clean any possible overspray prior to setting these assemblies onto the cab doors.

Bill Bowman


Mon Jul 13, 2015 11:08 pm
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Post Re: BulliBill's 1959 Double-Cab restoration...
A week ago I was sitting in the garage late one evening staring at and gloating about the completion of the window assemblies for the DC. I was soooo proud! But I realized that I still had to mount them properly to the cab doors, and in the past I've often had problems getting the assembly to settle down all the way so that the gap was good on top and there was no metal painted frame to body contact. I REALLY HATE this part.

Perhaps it was over-confidence with my success with the vent window glass pressing, etc., but I decided to get the suspense over with. I asked my wife to come down to the garage and help me lift the finished window assemblies into place on the cab doors. The new seal between the window assemblies and the top of the doors was already in place, so after a little "verbal run-thru" of what we were about to do, she grabbed the rear-most post and I held the forward-most two posts and we moved into position to insert the posts into the passenger side cab door. I got her post started by about 1/2 inch and then I slowly and carefully started both forward posts. We slowly and evenly lowered the assembly down until it rested lightly on the top seal. I cut her loose and slowly used both my fingernails...

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...and a H.F. plastic pry bar...

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...to push and pull the rubber seal every which-way to allow the window assembly to settle fully downward.

After about 20 minutes of careful and deliberate rubber manipulation and a bit of swearing I had the window assembly down and joined to the top of the cab door. I inserted the mounting screws, bolts and nuts and washers and tightened them finger tight.

The moment of truth, would the door close properly without any high spots or paint to paint contact? I held my breath and gently closed to door and watched for any issues. Success! Without any of the previous issues on other Splitties the door closed nicely and had nice gaps all the way around!

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What a relief! So while pulling inward on the inner round bead of rubber with fingers and the plastic pry bar so that the bead would not be pinched by the window frame assembly coming further together with the cab door, I further tightened the fastener hardware a little at a time until nice and snug. Once I was totally happy with the fit, I gave them a final snugging with the appropriate tools.

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At this point I broke out the outer upside-down "T" weatherstrip and got ready to install it too (this seal goes on the outer surfaces of the window assembly and seals the top of the window assembly to the body). I smeared some of the slippery goo into the painted metal track and started at the rear-most end and fed it up and around the top and then down the forward most side until fully in place. I left a little excess at both ends for now, to be trimmed off later. A quick wipe with a moist microfiber towel cleaned up all of the excess slippery goo. At this point to assist that top seal to slide against the body paint when opening/closing, I shook a little pile of baby powder into the palm of my left hand and using my right index finger, I applied and smeared a thin film of the powder...

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...on the inner surface only of the top seal. This made the rubber slide nicely against the paint and allowed much easier opening of the door once closed.

Move to the drivers side door and... repeat the entire process!

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Door slightly open...

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Door fully closed...

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On both doors, the inner round bead had to be cut and at the bend it overlapped, so I carefully used a fresh razor blade to cut out about 1/2" of the round beading to have them lay together as if they were joined. You can barely see the cut line in the photo.

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I was so happy to have this chore done, and surprised that both sides went so well! Now I'm inspired to go back to my other Buses and get them straightened out too.

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Bill Bowman


Sun Jul 19, 2015 10:24 pm
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Post Re: BulliBill's 1959 Double-Cab restoration...
the work never ends...

I have a question about the generator "polarizing" process...

I have a "thin-slot" Bosch LJ/REF/160/6/2500 L21 six volt factory "exchange" generator that hasn't been used since it was rebuilt for the "VW exchange" motor program by the VW factory back in the early 60's. It obviously needs to be polarized before use (very soon!).

My 1959 Factory workshop Service manual basically says the following about the "polarizing" process:

About the wires coming out of the generator case, "The thicker cable from the generator comes from the positive brush and must be connected to the "D+" terminal of the voltage regulator. The thinner cable comes from the field coils and must be connected to the terminal "DF" at the bottom of the voltage regulator".

I understand that you disconnect the voltage regulator from the wires coming out of the generator. So you have the generator either strapped down on the generator stand with the regulator completely disconnected from the generator wires, or you can do this with just the generator itself on a workbench. You'll need a few jumper wires and of course an appropriate 6 or 12 volt automotive battery for the generator you have.

The manual goes on to say about the "polarizing" process: "Cable "DF" of the generator needs to be connected to ground (D-), the positive battery terminal connected to terminal (D+), and the negative battery terminal connected to ground (D-)".

"D-" can be the ground screw on the generator case or a ground on the crankcase. The generator needs to hooked up and spun as a motor for just a second or two to "polarize" it.

Okay, my question is related to the fact that I have one wire coming out of one hole in my "L21" generator case, and TWO wires coming out of the other hole (one thick and one thin) and both of those are attached to terminal #61 below the voltage regulator.

one thinner wire on the left... and two (one thick and one thin) wires on the right...
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close up of the two on the right...
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in this shot you can see the ground screw, and the end of the Bosch generator part number "L21" on the generator case...
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I guess my question is: When "polarizing", do I treat the two wires as one and keep them connected together for the polarizing hook ups? I really don't want to damage this virtually new factory rebuilt generator. while "polarizing" or when we fire up this engine!

Thanks for any advice from our electrical geniuses out there!

Bill Bowman


Mon Aug 03, 2015 10:14 pm
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Post Re: BulliBill's 1959 Double-Cab restoration...
I was recently checking on my "to do" list and saw an item that I wanted to take apart and fix. I remember reading in my 1959 VW Workshop service manual about the instructions for using a putty sealant while assembling the components of the front "bullet" turn signal assemblies. So I quickly dis-assembled my turn signals and broke out some plumbing putty. I got some from my home supplies on-hand (or you can pick it up at your local H.D.) and rolled out a goob of it into a string with the palms of my hands. In the photo below my string of putty was still a little too thick, but I rolled it out a little more until it was about 1mm in diameter.

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There is a great cut-away drawing in your Bentley manual showing where in the turn signal assembly you should use the sealant to keep moisture from entering and eventually causing havoc. The instructions say to roll a 1mm diameter string of putty and shows you where to lay it between the lens and the outer metal shell before assembly. It was very easy to do, and as you pressed the lens into place to line up the outer screws, the putty easily squished in to shape to seal up that area from the ingress of moisture.

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Once you have everything all re-assembled you can use your fingernail to clean off any excess putty that squeezes out onto the exterior of the turn signal assembly for a nice, clean, SEALED look. The shot below was taken before I used both my fingernail and a micro screwdriver to gently remove the visible creamy-colored putty...

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Rain while driving or the occasional car washing won't be an issue for these assemblies anymore. One more little thing checked off my "assembly to-do" list!

Bill


Sun Aug 09, 2015 7:21 am
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Post Re: BulliBill's 1959 Double-Cab restoration...
Awesome Progress Bill!

Guess we need a Missourimicros engine install and fire night really soon.

I'm down! Let us know!


Seeya .
Ted.

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Sun Aug 09, 2015 2:14 pm
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Post Re: BulliBill's 1959 Double-Cab restoration...
You're too late!!!

The motor is in as of 6pm this evening!


Woooo fuckin' Hoooooo!

Bill


Sun Aug 09, 2015 7:53 pm
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Post Re: BulliBill's 1959 Double-Cab restoration...
So this afternoon, I decided to dive back into the engine compartment. I finally installed one of my "Blazecut" automatic fire suppression systems to the ceiling, went in easy, no kinks or any issues! Nice to have it aboard, but I'm still going to carry at least one dry chemical fire extinguisher as a back-up...

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A week or two ago, I started to stitch together the awesome reproduction heater wrap/insulation covers that Neil Pickett originally made for me. I started with the two short NOS metal flex hoses (thanks for those goes out to buddy Dan Scott who offered them up for this project). I bought a "speedy stitcher" and some waxed thread and watched some how-to videos on Youtube. Hell, it was pretty easy! First I added an extra layer of foil-enclosed bubble insulation around the flex tubes, then installed the wrap covering and sewed them on, so they ought to hold the heat for the cabin very nicely!

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So since they were sewn on and ready to go, I installed them to the "muffler on the heater tubes to the front.

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Hell, there was pretty much nothing stopping me now, so I kept pushing on! A neighbor was called over for an assist, and in seconds we had the 36hp "exchange" motor off the ground and on my floor jack. Then I just rolled it over to the back of the Double-Cab, lined it up and said "what the hell". It was going in this evening!

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I took my sweet time, and carefully wrestled it into place, really nice working on a pristine engine and engine compartment. No dirt, grease, new seals, just a pleasure. My wife watched just in case something went wrong and she had to rescue me or something. It fought me a little, but eventually went in nicely. I still have a few things to hook up, but I have to work a 6:10am flight to Miami for a long Miami Beach layover. Once it was all bolted in, I called it a successful evening and here it is...

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I can't wait to get back on it on Wednesday!

Bill


Sun Aug 09, 2015 8:49 pm
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Post Re: BulliBill's 1959 Double-Cab restoration...
Hi all,

Spent a lot of time yesterday surrounding the mounted 36hp "exchange" program motor. Had a spinning upper driver-side engine mount bolt, so had to vise grip the forward end to get the bolt to stay still so I could finally tighten the nut in the engine compartment. Hooked up the choke cable and accelerator cables to the carb, had to futz with the heater cables to get 'em attached to the heater boxes, and of course adjusting the clutch cable. It's a bitch to get old guy hands up in there with any dexterity... Then feed and attach the new wiring harness to the generator (now "polarized") and wires to the coil and oil pressure sender. Installed the new group 19 six volt battery, got idiot lights! Pretty much ready for the break-in run. Unfortunately something had to act up, and when I test-fired the starter, it sounds like it is spinning but not turning the engine, so I'm guessing there is an issue with the solenoid engaging the flywheel. Got to figure that out before I can move on to test run the motor. I have a few extra used 6 volt started of unknown quality just in case, but I wish this era-correct starter in the Bus would function! No gas or oil added to the Double-Cab yet.

I've already adjusted the valve lash, and now I need to drag out the manual and ballpark set-up the 28PCI carb. Then static-time the centrifugal advance distributor. Then add oil and check for leaks, then add gas and check for leaks. The spark plugs are removed and oil pressure sender pulled off, so that on "fire-up day" I can first build up oil pressure. Once oil squirts out the sender hole, I'll install the sender and wire, crank it over a few more turns and then install the plugs and wires. Then turn the key and see what the hell happens? But I gotta fly/work today through DFW and IAH to Miami Beach for a long layover tonight/tomorrow. Anything "VW" going on in Miami on Saturday?

Bill


Fri Aug 14, 2015 7:08 am
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Post Re: BulliBill's 1959 Double-Cab restoration...
BulliBill wrote:
Had a spinning upper driver-side engine mount bolt, so had to vise grip the forward end to get the bolt to stay still so I could finally tighten the nut in the engine compartment.


I like to wrap the shank of the bolt with some eletrical tape to give the bolt a little friction in the hole and keep this from happening. It helps the bolt hold still so I can put the nut on and tighten from the engine side.


Fri Aug 14, 2015 9:48 am
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Post Re: BulliBill's 1959 Double-Cab restoration...
Good idea, I had been thinking of some sort of sealant to goo it all up, same result. But your idea is cleaner!

I did get it tightened a few days ago, and now I'm fighting a starter motor that spins but the solenoid won't engage the flywheel, so I may be swapping out starters before I get the chance to finally start this bitch up for the first time!

Bill


Mon Aug 17, 2015 7:51 pm
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Post Re: BulliBill's 1959 Double-Cab restoration...
Today:

Discovered and dragged out one more NOS find, a 1955 date-coded starter/solenoid assembly!

Disconnected the battery completely.

Jacked the Double-Cab up and onto jack stands. Pulled the right rear wheel. Got busy carefully removing the used Dec 1958 date-coded starter/solenoid (faulty). Had to add a connector to one wire, and then oh, so carefully re-installed the NOS starter assembly (trying not to scratch any pretty paint)getting it up and in there. Got it in and wired up, woooo hoooo!

Pulled the right rear drum, as I recently saw a single drop of gear oil on the wheel below the weep hole. I wanted to verify if any was inside the drum. Thankfully the brake area was clean as a whistle. The drip came from the weep hole. Re-installed the drum and torqued axle nut (217 ft. lbs.).

Went around and checked lug nut holes to be sure that I already had removed paint (I had) and then torqued all lug nuts to 84 ft. lbs. (recommended is 80 to 92 ft. lbs.) I'm driving this "bitch" soon!

I hooked up the battery again and still had the plugs out. I added 2 2/3 quarts of 30 wt. oil, yay! no leaks! Added oil to the Bus air cleaner. I had already ball-park tuned the dwell and timing settings and initial carb settings. With plugs out, I held my breath again and turned the key to "start". Yes! This time the starter spun the compression-less engine nicely and I watched for the green oil pressure light to go out as the engine built up oil pressure. Yipeee! All is going well. Just before quitting, I went out and bought 2 gallons of premium fuel and will load that into the tank in the morning. I work a flight assignment to L.A. and then Atlanta at noon, so I "might" get to hear that "VW 36hp exchange" motor fire back to life after 40 years of sitting on both a dealership shelf and my garage shelf. That is unless it explodes! If it doesn't, I'll do the static break-in run (between 2,000 and 2,500 rpm for 15 minutes, and then drop/change the oil, re-adjust valves and timing, and re-adjust the carb). That is "if" I have the time before heading to work. Crossing my fingers! I should get to bed!

Bill


Tue Aug 18, 2015 10:41 pm
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Post Re: BulliBill's 1959 Double-Cab restoration...
Alright Bill, your bringing the DC to buses right? 8)


Thu Aug 20, 2015 8:31 pm
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Post Re: BulliBill's 1959 Double-Cab restoration...
Not sure about that yet. We only have enough drivers to bring the Buses we absolutely need to survive running the weekend. And between flying a full flight schedule in August and getting everything ready for the BNNTA weekend, my plate is pretty full. There are lots of little things that need to get done, adjusted, broken-in, test run so that I would feel confident driving the DC more that a few blocks from my hose, let alone 120 miles away (one-way). If I knew of some way to get it trailered there and back, then bringing the DC would be a no-brainer. It could be driven around locally there, and hauled back home. I "hate" trailer queens, but this is too fresh right now to trust on a long drive. The DC would need some serious shake-down miles on it with lots of little adjustments before I would feel confident just driving it there and back. First and foremost, I have an event to run, with lots of friends coming from long distances, and that is priority number one right now. But any extra time I have goes into tweaking on the DC. Just landed from L.A. an hour ago (had "Mr. "T" from the "A Team" TV show and "Rocky III" movie on board, got his autograph, nice guy!) so now I need to get downstairs into the garage this afternoon to work on the DC. The BNNTA event trophies and dash plaques and window stickers are here, T-shirts are beings finished up, artwork for all is awesome!

Busy, busy, busy! Can't wait to see Roy at Kent's tomorrow!

Bill


Fri Aug 21, 2015 12:00 pm
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